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Tractor-Trailer Truck Driver

30,574

Statewide
Job Postings
1st

Out of 439
Jobs In-Demand
52,560

Currently Employed
in Indiana
$16.06 - $24.46

Avg. Hourly Wage
Indiana
$15.71 - $24.13

Avg. Hourly Wage
USA
map Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 12 Region 6 Region 7 Region 8 Region 9 Region 10 Region 11

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Tractor-Trailer Truck Driver - Indiana Regions Overview:

The graph above shows that there were 30,574 job postings for the occupation of Tractor-Trailer Truck Driver in Indiana during 2013 and 2014. The vertical bar chart shows which regions had the most demand for Tractor-Trailer Truck Driver. These numbers represent current demand as advertised in online job postings and do not necessarily indicate projected job growth in the future. Nevertheless, these numbers are a valid barometer for gauging recent job demand statewide and regionally in Indiana.

What Tractor-Trailer Truck Driver Do:

Drive a tractor-trailer combination or a truck with a capacity of at least 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight GVW . May be required to unload truck. Requires commercial drivers' license.

Common Job Activities:

  • Check vehicles to ensure that mechanical, safety, and emergency equipment is in good working order.
  • Follow appropriate safety procedures for transporting dangerous goods.
  • Inspect loads to ensure that cargo is secure.
  • Maintain logs of working hours or of vehicle service or repair status, following applicable state and federal regulations.
  • Secure cargo for transport, using ropes, blocks, chain, binders, or covers.
  • Follow special cargo-related procedures, such as checking refrigeration systems for frozen foods or providing food or water for livestock.
  • Maneuver trucks into loading or unloading positions, following signals from loading crew and checking that vehicle and loading equipment are properly positioned.
  • Report vehicle defects, accidents, traffic violations, or damage to the vehicles.
  • Obtain receipts or signatures for delivered goods and collect payment for services when required.
  • Drive trucks with capacities greater than 3 tons, including tractor-trailer combinations, to transport and deliver products, livestock, or other materials.
  • Check all load-related documentation for completeness and accuracy.
  • Read bills of lading to determine assignment details.
  • Drive trucks to weigh stations before and after loading and along routes in compliance with state regulations.
  • Collect delivery instructions from appropriate sources, verifying instructions and routes.
  • Couple or uncouple trailers by changing trailer jack positions, connecting or disconnecting air or electrical lines, or manipulating fifth-wheel locks.
  • Check conditions of trailers after contents have been unloaded to ensure that there has been no damage.
  • Inventory and inspect goods to be moved to determine quantities and conditions.
  • Perform basic vehicle maintenance tasks, such as adding oil, fuel, or radiator fluid or performing minor repairs.
  • Read and interpret maps to determine vehicle routes.
  • Crank trailer landing gear up or down to safely secure vehicles.
  • Wrap and secure goods using pads, packing paper, containers, or straps.
  • Operate equipment, such as truck cab computers, CB radios, phones, or global positioning systems (GPS) equipment to exchange necessary information with bases, supervisors, or other drivers.
  • Plan or adjust routes based on changing conditions, using computer equipment, global positioning systems (GPS) equipment, or other navigation devices to minimize fuel consumption and carbon emissions.
  • Load or unload trucks or help others with loading or unloading, using special loading-related equipment or other equipment as necessary.
  • Remove debris from loaded trailers.
  • Install or remove special equipment, such as tire chains, grader blades, plow blades, or sanders.
  • Operate idle reduction systems or auxiliary power systems to generate power from alternative sources, such as fuel cells, to reduce idling time, to heat or cool truck cabins, or to provide power for other equipment.
  • Perform emergency roadside repairs, such as changing tires or installing light bulbs, tire chains, or spark plugs.
  • Give directions to laborers who are packing goods and moving them onto trailers.
  • Drive electric or hybrid-electric powered trucks or alternative fuel-powered trucks to transport and deliver products, livestock, or other materials.
  • Operate trucks equipped with snowplows or sander attachments to maintain roads in winter weather.

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