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Heat Treating Technician

41

Statewide
Job Postings
354th

Out of 439
Jobs In-Demand
1,960

Currently Employed
in Indiana
$17.24 - $25.61

Avg. Hourly Wage
Indiana
$14.41 - $22.41

Avg. Hourly Wage
USA
map Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 12 Region 6 Region 7 Region 8 Region 9 Region 10 Region 11

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Heat Treating Technician - Indiana Regions Overview:

The graph above shows that there were 41 job postings for the occupation of Heat Treating Technician in Indiana during 2013 and 2014. The vertical bar chart shows which regions had the most demand for Heat Treating Technician. These numbers represent current demand as advertised in online job postings and do not necessarily indicate projected job growth in the future. Nevertheless, these numbers are a valid barometer for gauging recent job demand statewide and regionally in Indiana.

Top 3 Certifications

There are not any certifications requested by Indiana employers for this occupation.
To view certifications requested for this occupation on a national level, go to mynextmove.com

What Heat Treating Technician Do:

Set up, operate, or tend heating equipment, such as heat-treating furnaces, flame-hardening machines, induction machines, soaking pits, or vacuum equipment to temper, harden, anneal, or heat-treat metal or plastic objects.

Common Job Activities:

  • Read production schedules and work orders to determine processing sequences, furnace temperatures, and heat cycle requirements for objects to be heat-treated.
  • Determine flame temperatures, current frequencies, heating cycles, and induction heating coils needed, based on degree of hardness required and properties of stock to be treated.
  • Record times that parts are removed from furnaces to document that objects have attained specified temperatures for specified times.
  • Determine types and temperatures of baths and quenching media needed to attain specified part hardness, toughness, and ductility, using heat-treating charts and knowledge of methods, equipment, and metals.
  • Set up and operate die-quenching machines to prevent parts from warping.
  • Examine parts to ensure metal shades and colors conform to specifications, using knowledge of metal heat-treating.
  • Adjust controls to maintain temperatures and heating times, using thermal instruments and charts, dials and gauges of furnaces, and color of stock in furnaces to make setting determinations.
  • Set and adjust speeds of reels and conveyors for prescribed time cycles to pass parts through continuous furnaces.
  • Start conveyors and open furnace doors to load stock, or signal crane operators to uncover soaking pits and lower ingots into them.
  • Set up and operate or tend machines, such as furnaces, baths, flame-hardening machines, and electronic induction machines, that harden, anneal, and heat-treat metal.
  • Load parts into containers and place containers on conveyors to be inserted into furnaces, or insert parts into furnaces.
  • Test parts for hardness, using hardness testing equipment, or by examining and feeling samples.
  • Remove parts from furnaces after specified times, and air dry or cool parts in water, oil brine, or other baths.
  • Move controls to light gas burners and to adjust gas and water flow and flame temperature.
  • Place completed workpieces on conveyors, using cold rods, tongs, or chain hoists, or signal crane operators to transport them to subsequent stations.
  • Signal forklift operators to deposit or extract containers of parts into and from furnaces and quenching rinse tanks.
  • Mount workpieces in fixtures, on arbors, or between centers of machines.
  • Reduce heat when processing is complete to allow parts to cool in furnaces or machinery.
  • Mount fixtures and industrial coils on machines, using hand tools.
  • Heat billets, bars, plates, rods, and other stock to specified temperatures preparatory to forging, rolling, or processing, using oil, gas, or electrical furnaces.
  • Position stock in furnaces, using tongs, chain hoists, or pry bars.
  • Instruct new workers in machine operation.
  • Repair, replace, and maintain furnace equipment as needed, using hand tools.
  • Clean oxides and scales from parts or fittings, using steam sprays or chemical and water baths.
  • Stamp heat-treatment identification marks on parts, using hammers and punches.

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