Search icon

Forester

15

Statewide
Job Postings
409th

Out of 439
Jobs In-Demand
90

Currently Employed
in Indiana
$18.64 - $29.40

Avg. Hourly Wage
Indiana
$22.81 - $34.18

Avg. Hourly Wage
USA
map Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 12 Region 6 Region 7 Region 8 Region 9 Region 10 Region 11

Job Overview Button Salary Button Skills Button Certifications Button Training Programs Button Recent Grads Button

Forester - Indiana Regions Overview:

The graph above shows that there were 15 job postings for the occupation of Forester in Indiana during 2013 and 2014. The vertical bar chart shows which regions had the most demand for Forester. These numbers represent current demand as advertised in online job postings and do not necessarily indicate projected job growth in the future. Nevertheless, these numbers are a valid barometer for gauging recent job demand statewide and regionally in Indiana.

Top 3 Specialized Skills

There are not any certifications requested by Indiana employers for this occupation.
To view certifications requested for this occupation on a national level, go to mynextmove.com

What Forester Do:

Manage public and private forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber's worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. May determine how to conserve wildlife habitats, creek beds, water quality, and soil stability, and how best to comply with environmental regulations. May devise plans for planting and growing new trees, monitor trees for healthy growth, and determine optimal harvesting schedules.

Common Job Activities:

  • Monitor contract compliance and results of forestry activities to assure adherence to government regulations.
  • Negotiate terms and conditions of agreements and contracts for forest harvesting, forest management and leasing of forest lands.
  • Plan and supervise forestry projects, such as determining the type, number and placement of trees to be planted, managing tree nurseries, thinning forest and monitoring growth of new seedlings.
  • Establish short- and long-term plans for management of forest lands and forest resources.
  • Plan cutting programs and manage timber sales from harvested areas, assisting companies to achieve production goals.
  • Determine methods of cutting and removing timber with minimum waste and environmental damage.
  • Supervise activities of other forestry workers.
  • Perform inspections of forests or forest nurseries.
  • Plan and direct forest surveys and related studies and prepare reports and recommendations.
  • Direct, and participate in, forest fire suppression.
  • Contact local forest owners and gain permission to take inventory of the type, amount, and location of all standing timber on the property.
  • Map forest area soils and vegetation to estimate the amount of standing timber and future value and growth.
  • Choose and prepare sites for new trees, using controlled burning, bulldozers, or herbicides to clear weeds, brush, and logging debris.
  • Monitor forest-cleared lands to ensure that they are reclaimed to their most suitable end use.
  • Plan and implement projects for conservation of wildlife habitats and soil and water quality.
  • Subcontract with loggers or pulpwood cutters for tree removal and to aid in road layout.
  • Provide advice and recommendations, as a consultant on forestry issues, to private woodlot owners, firefighters, government agencies or to companies.
  • Analyze effect of forest conditions on tree growth rates and tree species prevalence and the yield, duration, seed production, growth viability, and germination of different species.
  • Monitor wildlife populations and assess the impacts of forest operations on population and habitats.
  • Develop techniques for measuring and identifying trees.
  • Study different tree species' classification, life history, light and soil requirements, adaptation to new environmental conditions and resistance to disease and insects.
  • Plan and direct construction and maintenance of recreation facilities, fire towers, trails, roads and bridges, ensuring that they comply with guidelines and regulations set for forested public lands.
  • Conduct public educational programs on forest care and conservation.
  • Develop new techniques for wood or residue use.

Search by Occupation

Search for the following Occupation
Show me results for





Show me occupations that have
number of Job Postings
Show me occupations that have
Annual Salaries $







email-btprint-bt create-bt

Find a Training Provider in Indiana

companys logos companys logos


>> See More Training Providers for this Occupation

Powerd by COSIndiana Chamber Foundation

Welcome to

Indiana's data resource connecting Hoosier skills with high-demand careers.

Please select a site view:

Middle-Skills

Learn about careers requiring post-secondary training of two years and less, such as certificates, certifications and Associate's degrees.

All Jobs

Learn about careers requiring all levels of training and education, such as certificates, certifications, Associate’s degrees, Bachelor’s degrees and graduate degrees.